1. Timelapse Slitscanner

    I created a slitscanner which works particularly well with single scene timelapse videos. The Processing program works with Quicktime videos and turns them into single images which are a compilation of pixels taken from the video frames.

    If the program is run with a non-timelapse video, the results become fun. Here’s Kina Grannis’s In Your Arms music video run through the program.

    Code available on Github

    Based off of Golan Levin’s simple slit scanner

    Source videos from Gerald DonovanDavid YuKina Grannis & Sulva Productions

     
  2. Macro lens tomfoolery

     
  3. The Lunar Eclipse & Blood Moon with Mars above

     
  4. 04.06.14 to 04.12.14

    This project is a visualized sequence of my electronic communications from one week. The seven bars represent the seven 24-hour periods from that week. The upper half of each day represents incoming interactions and the bottom represents outgoing. The red lines represent email, the blue is text messaging, the yellow is instant messaging and the green is phone calls. The grayed-out area of each day represents the time periods during which I was asleep.

    The end result looks quite like barcodes to me, especially if all the lines were black and the background were white. It’s almost as if I could scan the barcode for April 12th, 2014 and receive a record of all my electronic communications from that day.

    In comparison to live person-to-person communication, electronic communication methods are precise and recordable. I wanted to visualize this quantifiable information. Electronic communication leaves records in the form of chat history and email threads. All of these interactions have timestamps— they’re snapshots of communication. 

    Fun facts:

    • The majority of my communication is through email.
    • I received one call throughout the entire week.
    • Thursday was the most active day with 132 interactions.
    • Saturday was the least active day with 71 interactions. People actually do take a break during the weekends

    I began by collecting the timestamps of all my electronic communication in a spreadsheet. After a time-intensive test run of hand placing a hundred lines in Illustrator, I turned to Processing to create the visualizations by converting the timestamps into arrays of values to be plotted. And here they are:

    Sunday

    image

    Monday

    image

    Tuesday

    image

    Wednesday

    image

    Thursday

    image

    Friday

    image

    Saturday

    image

    Code on Github

     
  5. the definition of sublime

    standing atop the falls, looking out across the valley
    rounding a bend in the trail to be confronted by Half Dome
    climbing the sheer granite rock valley walls with my eyes
    catching a glimpse of El Cap through a break in the trees

    the feeling of being so keenly aware of my smallness
    in both time and physical stature
    yet oddly content with my place in the world

     
  6. Plays: 10

    I spent a couple hours this weekend compiling audio clips of abridged immigration stories from some of my dormmates. The audio is part of a proposal for a writing class— I thought I’d share the rough cut.

    Even such a short piece of audio hints towards the depth and intricacy of their stories and how immigrants and their descendants have contributed and continue to contribute to the cultural mosaic of our nation.

     
  7. Local Projects and Jake Barton are creating the next level of museums and memorials

     
  8. image: Download

    Nicholas Felton produces an annual report on his life. The above is the food section from his 2012 Feltron Report.
This sort of personal data collection is fascinating to me. There’s something inherently interesting about being able to identify trends and highlights, and draw connections throughout our lives that we aren’t aware of since we perceive the world on a day-to-day timeframe. And particularly with food.
Eating is such an intimate activity. What you choose to eat, whom you choose to eat with, and how you choose to eat. The way we choose to nourish ourselves is incredibly personal, in large part because of heavy ties to family and culture. But also because eating is quite possibly the only universal human activity where we voluntarily choose to put things inside our body. 
I’ve come across a few highly interesting photography projects related to food: Henry Hargreaves’s No Seconds, Band Riders, Burning Calories, Peter Menzel’s A Week of Groceries from Different Countries, Gabriele Galimberti Delicatessen with love. These have prompted to me to think of possible ideas of my own. And for this, I turn to Stanford Dining. Just the sheer quantity of food served is awe-inducing— over 3 million meals are served every year on this one campus. I wonder how many dishes are used per day, how much food waste compost is created, and how much variety there is in student’s food choices.
Maybe I’d spend one breakfast period photographing every waffle made by a student to observe the variance in waffle-making prowess (trust me, it’s easy to overfill or underfill the iron) and in topping choices. Or maybe I could take one compost bin and recreate whole meals out of the leftovers of students to comment on food waste in dining halls— let’s just say there’s a lot of it. Or I could chart how quickly different fruits are taken from their bins. Are bananas more popular than apples? What about pears? Or photograph the variance in meals of everyone from a varsity football player to a vegan living in Columbae.
Why is it that food photography is so intriguing? Well, it’s not just me. Within the past few years, food photography has exploded in tandem with the popularity of smartphones. Just take a peek at #foodporn on Instagram. People seriously like to take and share photographs of their food, and I think the reason is that photographs of our meals are essentially indirect selfies. 
A photograph of something you are about to eat says something about your mood, your whereabouts, and who you are as a person. 
After all, we are what we eat, right?

    Nicholas Felton produces an annual report on his life. The above is the food section from his 2012 Feltron Report.

    This sort of personal data collection is fascinating to me. There’s something inherently interesting about being able to identify trends and highlights, and draw connections throughout our lives that we aren’t aware of since we perceive the world on a day-to-day timeframe. And particularly with food.

    Eating is such an intimate activity. What you choose to eat, whom you choose to eat with, and how you choose to eat. The way we choose to nourish ourselves is incredibly personal, in large part because of heavy ties to family and culture. But also because eating is quite possibly the only universal human activity where we voluntarily choose to put things inside our body. 

    I’ve come across a few highly interesting photography projects related to food: Henry Hargreaves’s No SecondsBand RidersBurning Calories, Peter Menzel’s A Week of Groceries from Different Countries, Gabriele Galimberti Delicatessen with love. These have prompted to me to think of possible ideas of my own. And for this, I turn to Stanford Dining. Just the sheer quantity of food served is awe-inducing— over 3 million meals are served every year on this one campus. I wonder how many dishes are used per day, how much food waste compost is created, and how much variety there is in student’s food choices.

    Maybe I’d spend one breakfast period photographing every waffle made by a student to observe the variance in waffle-making prowess (trust me, it’s easy to overfill or underfill the iron) and in topping choices. Or maybe I could take one compost bin and recreate whole meals out of the leftovers of students to comment on food waste in dining halls— let’s just say there’s a lot of it. Or I could chart how quickly different fruits are taken from their bins. Are bananas more popular than apples? What about pears? Or photograph the variance in meals of everyone from a varsity football player to a vegan living in Columbae.

    Why is it that food photography is so intriguing? Well, it’s not just me. Within the past few years, food photography has exploded in tandem with the popularity of smartphones. Just take a peek at #foodporn on Instagram. People seriously like to take and share photographs of their food, and I think the reason is that photographs of our meals are essentially indirect selfies. 

    A photograph of something you are about to eat says something about your mood, your whereabouts, and who you are as a person. 

    After all, we are what we eat, right?

     
  9. image: Download

    Making mochi is therapeutic.
As is eating mochi.

    Making mochi is therapeutic.

    As is eating mochi.

     
  10. Stanford University: Then and Now

    Finally had the time to start a project I’ve had in my head for a while. Stanford is a young’un compared to many of the East Coast universities, but it still claims more than a century of history. I sourced this set of historical photographs from the SALLIE database, captured the present-day views, and then matched each pair of images.

    In future, I’d like to match lighting conditions, achieve more exact views, and maybe play around with cropping angles.